Courses

Courses by semester

Courses for Fall 2022

Complete Cornell University course descriptions are in the Courses of Study .

Course ID Title Offered
PSYCH1101 Introduction to Psychology Why are people superstitious?  Why do people blush when they are embarrassed?  What is intelligence (and are IQ tests a good way to measure it)?  Why don't psychopaths feel guilty when they harm others?  How reliable are childhood memories?  Why do we laugh?  Do violent video games make people act violently?  Why do some people seem instantly trustworthy and others seem "creepy"?  How do we choose whom to sleep with, date, or marry?  How does stress affect our body?  While questions like these have been asked for centuries, psychology has begun to provide answers to these--and other questions about the human mind--by applying the tools of scientific investigation. In this course you will receive a broad introduction to the science of psychology: from the history of the field and its major advances, to the latest research on topics such as perception, memory, intelligence, morality, sexuality, mental illness, religion, language, and creativity.  You will also learn about the tools and methods psychologists use to investigate the mind, such as observing how the mind of a child changes and develops over time, looking at people across cultures, measuring brain activity, and experimentally manipulating everything from the shape of a figure presented on a computer screen, to the smell of a room, or the attractiveness of the experimenter.

Full details for PSYCH 1101 - Introduction to Psychology

Fall, Summer.
PSYCH1120 FWS:Personality & Social Psychology

Full details for PSYCH 1120 - FWS:Personality & Social Psychology

PSYCH1130 FWS:Behavioral Evolution Psych

Full details for PSYCH 1130 - FWS:Behavioral Evolution Psych

PSYCH1140 FWS: Perception, Cognition & Development

Full details for PSYCH 1140 - FWS: Perception, Cognition & Development

PSYCH1500 Introduction to Environmental Psychology Environmental Psychology is an interdisciplinary field concerned with how the physical environment and human behavior interrelate. Most of the course focuses on how residential environments and urban and natural settings affect human health and well-being. Students also examine how human attitudes and behaviors affect environmental quality. Issues of environmental justice and culture are included throughout. Hands-on projects plus exams.

Full details for PSYCH 1500 - Introduction to Environmental Psychology

Fall, Summer.
PSYCH1501 Introduction to Environmental Psychology - Writing in the Major Human-Environment Relations is an interdisciplinary field concerned with how the physical environment and human behavior interrelate. Most of the course focuses on how residential environments and urban and natural settings affect human health and well-being. Students also examine how human attitudes and behaviors affect environmental quality. Issues of environmental justice and culture are included throughout. Hands-on projects plus exams. Lecture and discussion sections. WIM section attend a regular lecture but also meets weekly with a graduate writing tutor. The two principal objectives of WIM section:

Full details for PSYCH 1501 - Introduction to Environmental Psychology - Writing in the Major

Fall.
PSYCH2230 Intro to Behavioral Neuroscience Introduction to psychology from a biological perspective, which focuses on brain mechanisms of behavior. Topics include the structure and function of the nervous system, physiological approaches to understanding behavior, hormones and behavior, biological bases of sensation and perception, learning and memory, cognition, emotion, and communication.

Full details for PSYCH 2230 - Intro to Behavioral Neuroscience

Fall, Summer.
PSYCH2350 Multilingualism and Multiculturalism in Early Childhood Children who grow up in multilingual environments have a profoundly different experience compared to monolingual children. In this course, we examine the nature and impact of this experience on the socio-emotional, cognitive, and linguistic development of young children, focusing on the complex multilingual and multicultural reality in Israel as our main case study. Specifically, we explore the multilingual development of children from several minority and immigrant groups in Israel: Arabs, Former Soviet Union (FSU) and Ethiopian immigrants, Israeli-born children of labor migrants, deaf communities, among others.

Full details for PSYCH 2350 - Multilingualism and Multiculturalism in Early Childhood

Fall.
PSYCH2415 Introduction to Moral Psychology This course is an introduction to the moral mind from philosophical and psychological perspectives. Many traditional philosophical problems about morality are being illuminated by current work in cognitive science. In this course, we will look at several of these problems. In each case, we will begin with a presentation of the philosophical problems, and we will proceed to examine recent empirical work on the topic. A wide range of topics will be covered, including moral judgment, agency, the self, and punishment.

Full details for PSYCH 2415 - Introduction to Moral Psychology

Fall.
PSYCH2500 Statistics and Research Design In a complex environment with many sources of variability, how can one tell with confidence whether a particular observed effect is real? And how much confidence is appropriate? This course introduces the principles of statistical description and inference as strategies to answer these questions, with emphasis on methods of principal relevance to psychology, neuroscience, and the behavioral sciences.

Full details for PSYCH 2500 - Statistics and Research Design

Fall.
PSYCH2650 Psychology and Law This course explores how cognitive, social & clinical psychology are used in law. Law makes many assumptions about human psychology, and lawyers and judges regularly rely on psychological research in their cases. The course examines the psychology underlying criminal confessions; children's testimony; the insanity defense; risk assessment; judge and jury decision making; criminal punishment; constitutional law; and common law (tort, contract, and property) disputes. The course assesses the use and misuse of psychology in these subjects.  

Full details for PSYCH 2650 - Psychology and Law

Fall.
PSYCH2800 Introduction to Social Psychology Introduction to research and theory in social psychology. Topics include social influence, persuasion, and attitude change; culture, social interaction and group phenomena; evoluation, altruism, and aggression; stereotyping, prejudice and discrimination; everyday reasoning and judgment.

Full details for PSYCH 2800 - Introduction to Social Psychology

Fall, Summer.
PSYCH2801 Introduction to Social Psychology: Writing in the Majors Writing in the Majors section of PSYCH 2800. In addition to attending all the lectures in PSYCH 2800, students will attend an additional weekly seminar and all assessment is based on writing instead of exams. This course is an introduction to research and theory in social psychology, covering the same material as in PSYCH 2800 (social influence, persuasion, and attitude change; social interaction and group phenomena; altruism and aggression; stereotyping and prejudice; everyday reasoning and judgment).

Full details for PSYCH 2801 - Introduction to Social Psychology: Writing in the Majors

Spring.
PSYCH2820 Community Outreach Provides students with information and perspectives essential to volunteer fieldwork with human and social service programs in the community. Readings are drawn from the field of community psychology and include analyses of successful programs, such as Head Start, as well as a review of the methods by which those programs are developed and assessed. Although students are not required to volunteer, the instructor provides students with a list of local agencies open to student placements.

Full details for PSYCH 2820 - Community Outreach

Fall.
PSYCH2830 Research Methods in Human Development This course will introduce students to the basics of research design and will review several methodologies in the study of human development. The focus of the course will be on descriptive and experimental methods. Students will learn the advantages and challenges to different methodological approaches. The course also places an emphasis on developing students' scientific writing and strengthening their understanding of statistics.

Full details for PSYCH 2830 - Research Methods in Human Development

Fall.
PSYCH3190 Memory and the Law Focuses on how the scientific study of human memory interfaces with the theory and practice of law.

Full details for PSYCH 3190 - Memory and the Law

Fall.
PSYCH3220 Hormones and Behavior Covers comparative and evolutionary approaches to the study of the relationship between peripheral hormones and neuroendocrine mechanisms in vertebrates, including humans, with sexual behavior, affiliative bonds and social grouping, parental behavior, aggression, mating systems, stress, learning and memory, and biological rhythms.

Full details for PSYCH 3220 - Hormones and Behavior

Fall.
PSYCH3240 Behavioral Neuroscience Laboratory This course is designed to provide an introduction to experimental research on the neural basis of behavior and cognition in animals. Topics will include basic neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, neural and hormonal control of behavior, and learning and memory. Students will gain extensive hands on experience with a variety of laboratory techniques, and animal species, and behaviors.

Full details for PSYCH 3240 - Behavioral Neuroscience Laboratory

Fall.
PSYCH3270 Field Practicum I Composed of three components that form an intensive undergraduate field practicum. First, students spend three to six hours a week at local mental health agencies, schools, or nursing facilities working directly with children, adolescents, or adults; supervision is provided by host agency staff. Second, the instructor provides additional weekly individual, clinical supervision for each student. Third, seminar meetings cover issues of adult and developmental psychopathology, clinical technique, case studies, and current research issues. Students write one short paper, two final take-home exams, and present an account of their field experience in class.

Full details for PSYCH 3270 - Field Practicum I

Fall.
PSYCH3300 Introduction to Computational Neuroscience Covers the basic ideas and techniques involved in computational neuroscience. Surveys diverse topics, including neural dynamics of small networks of cells, neural coding, learning in neural networks and in brain structures, memory models of the hippocampus, sensory coding, and others.

Full details for PSYCH 3300 - Introduction to Computational Neuroscience

Fall.
PSYCH3310 Developmental Psychopathology Why do some children grow up well-adjusted and others do not? This course applies a developmental framework to understanding psychological disorders. We will consider the common disorders of childhood and adolescence; the individual contexts which promote risk versus resiliency; trends and trajectories in disorders over time; and the complex ethical issues associated with the diagnosis and treatment of disorders early in life.

Full details for PSYCH 3310 - Developmental Psychopathology

Fall.
PSYCH3820 Prejudice and Stereotyping This course will familiarize you with the basic experimental social psychology research that investigates how our thoughts and beliefs (stereotypes), evaluative attitudes (prejudice), and behavioral responses (discrimination) toward individuals shift as a function of their group membership.  We will explore how empirical research developed from primarily examining explicit (blatant) prejudice in the 20th century to recent examinations of implicit forms of stereotyping and prejudice.  We will explore how stereotyping and prejudice can arise from basic perceptual and categorical processes, discuss strategies for minimizing expressed bias in interpersonal situations, and examine the experience of high status - and the consequences of losing it.  The ultimate aim is to enhance your ability to evaluate and analyze the scientific merit of this research and apply it to real world social issues.

Full details for PSYCH 3820 - Prejudice and Stereotyping

Spring.
PSYCH4270 Evolution of Language Seminar surveying a cross-section of modern theories, methods, and research pertaining to the origin and evolution of language. Considers evidence from psychology, the cognitive neurosciences, comparative psychology, and computational modeling of evolutionary processes. Topics for discussion may include: What does the fossil record tell us about language evolution? What can we learn from comparative perspectives on neurobiology and behavior? Can apes really learn language? Did language come about through natural selection? What were the potential preadaptations for language? What is the relationship between phylogeny and ontogeny?

Full details for PSYCH 4270 - Evolution of Language

Fall.
PSYCH4320 Topics in Cognitive Science A seminar series examining current and classical ideas in human sciences and the humanities.  Themes vary from semester to semester.

Full details for PSYCH 4320 - Topics in Cognitive Science

Fall, Spring.
PSYCH4382 Language and Thought The intricate relations between language and thought have stirred a heated debate from ancient philosophy to the era of modern science. Does language precede thought or vice versa? Do different languages create a different understanding of one's physical and social environment?  In this course we will examine some leading theories and empirical studies on the interconnections between these two complex abilities of the mind; and explore their developmental trajectories and interactions from infancy to adulthood.

Full details for PSYCH 4382 - Language and Thought

Spring, Summer.
PSYCH4420 The Psychology and Ethics of 21st Century Technology New technologies are changing our world at a rapid pace. In many cases, the society does not fully understand the impact of technology and is not prepared for the speed of the change that is occurring. This seminar will explore a few of these new technologies and investigate their effects on the users and on the society at large. The topics that will be explored include face recognition, virtual reality, violence in media, general AI, and the technological singularity. We will look at the ways in which these technologies affect our lives, with a focus on education, entertainment, employment, politics, and the future of humanity.

Full details for PSYCH 4420 - The Psychology and Ethics of 21st Century Technology

Fall.
PSYCH4500 Psychology at the Sciencenter! This course will give an opportunity to learn how to communicate concepts and knowledge from the psychological sciences. We will examine the challenges associated with science communications, including ways to engage the perspectives of diverse audiences, and evaluation of the effects of the interaction on the audience's knowledge and attitudes. Most of our activities will focus on the development of exhibits for the Sciencenter of Ithaca. We will develop exhibit prototypes, evaluate the public's engagement and learning from them, and use the feedback to refine our prototypes. The goal will be to effectively convey current understanding of psychological processes to the general public, with an emphasis on engaging young children.

Full details for PSYCH 4500 - Psychology at the Sciencenter!

Fall.
PSYCH4550 The Psychology of Wisdom This course will cover the psychology of wisdom.  Among the topics to be covered are the definition of wisdom, theories and models of wisdom, development of wisdom, measurement of wisdom, relations of wisdom to other characteristics, state versus trait characteristics of wisdom, teaching for wisdom, wisdom and leadership, wisdom and society.

Full details for PSYCH 4550 - The Psychology of Wisdom

Fall.
PSYCH4700 Undergraduate Research in Psychology Practice in planning, conducting, and reporting independent laboratory, field, and/or library research.

Full details for PSYCH 4700 - Undergraduate Research in Psychology

Fall or Spring.
PSYCH4710 Advanced Undergraduate Research in Psychology Advanced experience in planning, conducting, and reporting independent laboratory, field, and/or library research. One, and preferably two, semesters of PSYCH 4700 is required. The research should be more independent and/or involve more demanding technical skills than that carried out in PSYCH 4700.

Full details for PSYCH 4710 - Advanced Undergraduate Research in Psychology

Fall or Spring.
PSYCH6000 General Research Seminar This course is designed to introduce first-year graduates to the Psychology Department faculty through a weekly series of presentations of current research.

Full details for PSYCH 6000 - General Research Seminar

Fall, Spring.
PSYCH6001 Graduate Professionalism Seminar This course enhances the graduate experience and prepares first-year psychology graduate students for success.  The student receives a formal introduction to conceptualizing and articulating a research project, science writing, the grant proposal and review processes, and numerous other aspects of professional development.  The course serves as an opportunity for preparation for graduate studies and a career in academics or a related profession.

Full details for PSYCH 6001 - Graduate Professionalism Seminar

Fall.
PSYCH6210 Behavioral and Brain Sciences Graduate seminar coupled with the Psychology Colloquium series. For 6-8 of the speakers, we read readings designated by the speaker in advance of their arrival, and meet with the speaker in the Thursday seminar. Intended for graduate students in the Field of Psychology who may register for this course without permission, all others please ask for permission from the instructor. Registration in both semesters is required.

Full details for PSYCH 6210 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences

Fall, Spring.
PSYCH6270 Evolution of Language Seminar surveying a cross-section of modern theories, methods, and research pertaining to the origin and evolution of language. Considers evidence from psychology, the cognitive neurosciences, comparative psychology, and computational modeling of evolutionary processes. Topics for discussion may include: what does the fossil record tell us about language evolution? What can we learn from comparative perspectives on neurobiology and behavior? Can apes really learn language? Did language come about through natural selection? What were the potential preadaptations for language? What is the relationship between phylogeny and ontogeny?

Full details for PSYCH 6270 - Evolution of Language

Fall.
PSYCH6271 Topics in Biopsychology Course explores current issues in Psychology.  Topics vary by section.

Full details for PSYCH 6271 - Topics in Biopsychology

Fall, Spring.
PSYCH6500 Psychology at the Sciencenter! This course will give an opportunity to learn how to communicate concepts and knowledge from the psychological sciences. We will examine the challenges associated with science communications, including ways to engage the perspectives of diverse audiences, and evaluation of the effects of the interaction on the audience's knowledge and attitudes. Most of our activities will focus on the development of exhibits for the Sciencenter of Ithaca. We will develop exhibit prototypes, evaluate the public's engagement and learning from them, and use the feedback to refine our prototypes. The goal will be to effectively convey current understanding of psychological processes to the general public, with an emphasis on engaging young children.

Full details for PSYCH 6500 - Psychology at the Sciencenter!

Fall.
PSYCH7000 Research in Biopsychology A graduate research seminar in biopsychology.

Full details for PSYCH 7000 - Research in Biopsychology

Fall, Spring.
PSYCH7100 Research in Human Experimental Psychology A graduate research seminar in human experimental psychology.

Full details for PSYCH 7100 - Research in Human Experimental Psychology

Fall, Spring.
PSYCH7200 Research in Social Psychology and Personality A graduate research seminar in social psychology and personality.

Full details for PSYCH 7200 - Research in Social Psychology and Personality

Fall, Spring.
PSYCH7220 Hormones and Behavior Covers comparative and evolutionary approaches to the study of the relationship between reproductive hormones and sexual behavior in vertebrates, including humans. Also hormonal contributions to other social behavior (parental behavior, aggression, mating systems) stress, learning and memory, and biological rhythms.

Full details for PSYCH 7220 - Hormones and Behavior

Fall.
PSYCH7750 Proseminar in Social Psychology I First semester of a year-long discussion-seminar course intended to give graduate students an in-depth understanding of current research and theory in social psychology. Emphasizes social cognition, but other topics, such as group dynamics, social influence, moral psychology, and emotional experience, are covered.

Full details for PSYCH 7750 - Proseminar in Social Psychology I

Fall.
PSYCH9000 Doctoral Thesis Research in Biopsychology A graduate seminar on doctoral thesis research in biopsychology.

Full details for PSYCH 9000 - Doctoral Thesis Research in Biopsychology

Fall, Spring.
PSYCH9100 Doctoral Thesis Research in Human Experimental Psychology A graduate seminar on doctoral thesis research in human experimental psychology.

Full details for PSYCH 9100 - Doctoral Thesis Research in Human Experimental Psychology

Fall, Spring.
PSYCH9200 Doctoral Thesis Research in Social Psychology and Personality A graduate seminar on doctoral thesis research in social psychology and personality.

Full details for PSYCH 9200 - Doctoral Thesis Research in Social Psychology and Personality

Fall, Spring.
HD1111 Success in Human Development This course offers a jump-start on planning your experience in the College of Human Ecology.

Full details for HD 1111 - Success in Human Development

Fall.
HD1150 Human Development: Infancy and Childhood Introduces students to the basic concepts, theories, and research in human development as they explain prenatal development and development in infancy and childhood, including physical, cognitive, and social/emotional development. The focus is on individual development from an interdisciplinary perspective with an emphasis on psychological development, but also drawing from the fields of sociology, history, biology, anthropology, neuroscience, and education.

Full details for HD 1150 - Human Development: Infancy and Childhood

Fall, Summer.
HD1155 FWS: Playing to Learn Children learn through play, but what they learn is influenced by how they're playing! In this course, we will explore how toys, games, and media shape children's learning experiences from infancy into middle childhood. We will discuss learning across the motor, cognitive, and social domains and ask questions such as: What makes a toy "developmentally appropriate"? How does learning change when children are playing alone? With a peer? With a parent? How well do children learn from television and electronic toys? Students will learn to write for broad audiences through diverse assignments such as reading reflections, scholarly literature reviews, and toy reviews and proposals.

Full details for HD 1155 - FWS: Playing to Learn

Fall.
HD1156 FWS: The Psychology of Remembering and Forgetting Why do people forget? Is forgetting the opposite of remembering? Is it a blessing or curse? By addressing these questions, this course will explore remembering and forgetting processes. By using texts from cultural, social, and cognitive psychology, we will examine human memory at the individual and collective levels. How do people remember and forget the past of themselves and their society? Are there any links from individual to collective memory? By the end of the course, students will be familiar with basic concepts of human memory and their implications in daily life. In exploring themes related to human memory, students will write personal reflection, opinion, and explanatory essays.

Full details for HD 1156 - FWS: The Psychology of Remembering and Forgetting

Fall.
HD2180 Human Development: Adulthood and Aging Introduces students to theories and research in adult development and aging. Describes biological, psychological and social changes from early through late adulthood. Identifies strategies to promote healthy aging at the individual and societal level.

Full details for HD 2180 - Human Development: Adulthood and Aging

Fall.
HD2200 The Human Brain and Mind: An Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience At the turn of the 21st century the age of Embodied Cognition dawned: a reconsideration of relationships between body, brain, and mind. Researchers in philosophy, psychology, linguistics, and cognitive neuroscience challenged the 20th-century dogma that the mind is like a digital computer, and can be studied independently of the body, brain, and world. Researchers turned their attention to the role that bodily experience plays in thinking and learning, and the roles neural systems for perception and action play in cognition. This course views the field of Cognitive Neuroscience through the lens of Embodied Cognition research, and evaluates the extent to which "embodiment" may be passing fad, a useful shift in perspective, or a revolutionary new way of building theories about brain and mind. 

Full details for HD 2200 - The Human Brain and Mind: An Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience

Fall.
HD2230 Intro to Behavioral Neuroscience Introduction to psychology from a biological perspective, which focuses on brain mechanisms of behavior. Topics include the structure and function of the nervous system, physiological approaches to understanding behavior, hormones and behavior, biological bases of sensation and perception, learning and memory, cognition, emotion, and communication.

Full details for HD 2230 - Intro to Behavioral Neuroscience

Fall.
HD2350 Multilingualism and Multiculturalism in Early Childhood Children who grow up in multilingual environments have a profoundly different experience compared to monolingual children. In this course, we examine the nature and impact of this experience on the socio-emotional, cognitive, and linguistic development of young children, focusing on the complex multilingual and multicultural reality in Israel as our main case study. Specifically, we explore the multilingual development of children from several minority and immigrant groups in Israel: Arabs, Former Soviet Union (FSU) and Ethiopian immigrants, Israeli-born children of labor migrants, deaf communities, among others.

Full details for HD 2350 - Multilingualism and Multiculturalism in Early Childhood

Fall.
HD2650 Psychology and Law This course explores how cognitive, social & clinical psychology are used in law. Law makes many assumptions about human psychology, and lawyers and judges regularly rely on psychological research in their cases. The course examines the psychology underlying criminal confessions; children's testimony; the insanity defense; risk assessment; judge and jury decision making; criminal punishment; constitutional law; and common law (tort, contract, and property) disputes. The course assesses the use and misuse of psychology in these subjects.  

Full details for HD 2650 - Psychology and Law

Fall.
HD2810 Introduction to Social Psychology Introduction to research and theory in social psychology. Topics include social influence, persuasion, and attitude change; culture, social interaction and group phenomena; evoluation, altruism, and aggression; stereotyping, prejudice and discrimination; everyday reasoning and judgment.

Full details for HD 2810 - Introduction to Social Psychology

Spring.
HD2820 Community Outreach Provides students with information and perspectives essential to volunteer fieldwork with human and social service programs in the community. Readings are drawn from the field of community psychology and include analyses of successful programs, such as Head Start, as well as a review of the methods by which those programs are developed and assessed. Although students are not required to volunteer, the instructor provides students with a list of local agencies open to student placements.

Full details for HD 2820 - Community Outreach

Fall.
HD2830 Research Methods in Human Development This course will introduce students to the basics of research design and will review several methodologies in the study of human development. The focus of the course will be on descriptive and experimental methods. Students will learn the advantages and challenges to different methodological approaches. The course also places an emphasis on developing students' scientific writing and strengthening their understanding of statistics.

Full details for HD 2830 - Research Methods in Human Development

Fall.
HD3110 Educational Psychology Educational psychology is the application of psychological principles and concepts to cases of teaching and learning. We study behavioral, cognitive, embodied, and social-cultural perspectives on learning and thinking, and we use them in planning and reflecting on weekly fieldwork outside the classroom. In the process, we become more mindful and skilled learners ourselves and better facilitators of others' learning.

Full details for HD 3110 - Educational Psychology

Fall, Spring.
HD3190 Memory and the Law Focuses on how the scientific study of human memory interfaces with the theory and practice of law.

Full details for HD 3190 - Memory and the Law

Fall.
HD3220 Hormones and Behavior Covers comparative and evolutionary approaches to the study of the relationship between peripheral hormones and neuroendocrine mechanisms in vertebrates, including humans, with sexual behavior, affiliative bonds and social grouping, parental behavior, aggression, mating systems, stress, learning and memory, and biological rhythms.

Full details for HD 3220 - Hormones and Behavior

Fall.
HD3270 Field Practicum I Composed of three components that form an intensive undergraduate field practicum. First, students spend three to six hours a week at local mental health agencies, schools, or nursing facilities working directly with children, adolescents, or adults; supervision is provided by host agency staff. Second, the instructor provides additional weekly individual, clinical supervision for each student. Third, seminar meetings cover issues of adult and developmental psychopathology, clinical technique, case studies, and current research issues. Students write one short paper, two final take-home exams, and present an account of their field experience in class.

Full details for HD 3270 - Field Practicum I

Fall.
HD3300 Developmental Psychopathology Why do some children grow up well-adjusted and others do not? This course applies a developmental framework to understanding psychological disorders. We will consider the common disorders of childhood and adolescence; the individual contexts which promote risk versus resiliency; trends and trajectories in disorders over time; and the complex ethical issues associated with the diagnosis and treatment of disorders early in life.

Full details for HD 3300 - Developmental Psychopathology

Fall.
HD3310 Psychology of Gender This course explores psychological research on gender, examining the interactions between biology and social learning, gender identity, stereotypes, gender non-conformity, and discrimination. We will critically evaluate sex-related comparisons in cognition, attitudes, leadership, close relationships, psychological development, achievement, communication, and health. We will engage with course material using an intersectional approach that acknowledges that gender development and expression are deeply impacted by race, social class, sexuality, and culture.

Full details for HD 3310 - Psychology of Gender

Fall.
HD3330 Children and the Law Examines psychological data and theories that shed light on the practical issues that arise when children enter the legal arena.

Full details for HD 3330 - Children and the Law

Fall.
HD4010 Empirical Research For study that predominantly involves data collection and analysis or laboratory or studio projects.

Full details for HD 4010 - Empirical Research

Fall, Spring.
HD4020 Supervised Fieldwork For study that involves both responsible participation in a community setting and reflection on that experience through discussion, reading, and writing. Academic credit is awarded for this integration of theory and practice.

Full details for HD 4020 - Supervised Fieldwork

Fall, Spring.
HD4030 Teaching Assistantship For study that includes assisting faculty with instruction.

Full details for HD 4030 - Teaching Assistantship

Fall, Spring.
HD4250 Translational Research on Decision Making Introductory laboratory-based course focusing on basic foundations in translational research on decision making across the lifespan. The course introduces students to hands-on applications of research skills in the context of research on decision making, spanning basic and applied research in law, medicine, behavioral economics, and policy. It focuses on such topics as human subjects protection, working with populations across the lifespan (e.g., children, seniors), database development, working with external partners and stakeholders (e.g., schools, hospitals), and basic concepts and techniques in decision research. Students participate in weekly laboratory meetings in small teams focused on specific projects as well as monthly meetings in which all teams participate. During laboratory meetings, students discuss ongoing research, plans for new studies, and interpretations of empirical findings from studies that are in progress or have been recently completed. New students work closely with experienced students and eventually work more independently. In order to fully grasp how the research projects fit into the broader field, students read relevant papers weekly and write reaction responses. Because several projects are ongoing at all times, students have the opportunity to be involved in more than one study and are assigned multiple tasks such as piloting research paradigms, subject recruitment, data collection, data analysis, and data entry. Students attend a weekly lab meeting for 1.5 hours per week, read pertinent papers, write reaction responses, and work 10.5 hours per week in the laboratory completing tasks that contribute to ongoing research studies.

Full details for HD 4250 - Translational Research on Decision Making

Fall.
HD4260 Translational Research on Memory and Neuroscience Laboratory-based course focusing on basic foundations in translational research on the neuroscience of human memory and memory development. Students attend a weekly lab meeting for 1.5 hours per week, read pertinent papers, write reaction responses, and work 10.5 hours per week in the laboratory completing tasks that contribute to ongoing research studies.

Full details for HD 4260 - Translational Research on Memory and Neuroscience

Fall.
HD4380 Language and Thought The intricate relations between language and thought have stirred a heated debate from ancient philosophy to the era of modern science. Does language precede thought or vice versa? Do different languages create a different understanding of one's physical and social environment?  In this course we will examine some leading theories and empirical studies on the interconnections between these two complex abilities of the mind; and explore their developmental trajectories and interactions from infancy to adulthood.

Full details for HD 4380 - Language and Thought

Fall.
HD4550 The Psychology of Wisdom This course will cover the psychology of wisdom.  Among the topics to be covered are the definition of wisdom, theories and models of wisdom, development of wisdom, measurement of wisdom, relations of wisdom to other characteristics, state versus trait characteristics of wisdom, teaching for wisdom, wisdom and leadership, wisdom and society.

Full details for HD 4550 - The Psychology of Wisdom

Fall.
HD4630 Introduction to Functional MRI Analysis for Human Neuroimaging Functional magnetic resonance imaging is a relatively new method of observing relationships between in-vivo neural activity and behavior. This method is a truly interdisciplinary feat combining engineering, physics, and biology, but is at times reduced in popular media as "pretty brain pictures." In this course, students will learn the promises and limitations of fMRI methods and becomes educated consumers and skeptics of both popular and scientific literature. In addition, students will have hands on experience in analyzing fMRI data from preprocessing to higher-level techniques using univariate and multivariate analyses. The final project will include submitting a fMRI study proposal complete with a literature review and analysis plan.

Full details for HD 4630 - Introduction to Functional MRI Analysis for Human Neuroimaging

Fall.
HD4850 Professional Development in Translational Research As a supplement to their immersive learning experience working on faculty research projects, students in this course will engage with actors and ideas from across the youth development research and practice communities, learn about research methods and dissemination to various audiences, and begin to see the world from a translational research perspective.

Full details for HD 4850 - Professional Development in Translational Research

Fall, Spring.
HD4860 Nearest Neighbor As a supplement to their immersive learning experience working on translational research projects led by CHE faculty, and building on their experience in HD4850 (Professional Development in Translational Research), this course will provide opportunities for students to put their learning into practice by proposing and implementing a translational research project in collaboration with community partners.

Full details for HD 4860 - Nearest Neighbor

Fall, Spring.
HD4990 Senior Honors Thesis

Full details for HD 4990 - Senior Honors Thesis

Fall, Spring.
HD6020 Research in Risk and Rational Decision Making This hands-on laboratory course will develop research skills in the context of risk and rational decision making in human development from multiple disciplinary perspectives and with respect to different kinds of decision-making under risk and uncertainty.  Topics will depend on student interests but may include decisions about war, terrorism, cancer control and prevention (e.g., screening tests), personal behaviors that involve risk (e.g., HIV prevention), and other public health risks (e.g., vaccinations), law enforcement (e.g., use of a weapon), and legal decision making (e.g., jury deliberations). Students will read the research literature, discuss the latest empirical findings and scientific theories of risk and rationality, and engage in group work and peer review to hone their skills.  Students will then design research projects and engage in research activities as well as read additional references tailored to their interests.

Full details for HD 6020 - Research in Risk and Rational Decision Making

Fall.
HD6190 Memory and the Law Focuses on how the scientific study of human memory interfaces with the theory and practice of law.  Students study relevant areas of memory research and memory theory.

Full details for HD 6190 - Memory and the Law

Fall.
HD6200 First-Year Proseminar in Human Development Designed as an orientation to the department and the university. Activities include attendance at research presentations, visits to departmental research laboratories, relevant informational sessions (e.g., Institutional Review Board for Human Participants, proposal writing), and guidance in preparing a public research presentation to be made at the end of spring semester.

Full details for HD 6200 - First-Year Proseminar in Human Development

Fall, Spring.
HD6635 Introduction to Scripting for Functional MRI Analysis in Human Neuroimaging Functional magnetic resonance imaging is a relatively new method of observing relationships between in-vivo neural activity and behavior. This method is a truly interdisciplinary feat combining engineering, physics, and biology, but is at times reduced in popular media as "pretty brain pictures." In this course, students will learn the promises and limitations of fMRI methods and become educated consumers and skeptics of both popular and scientific literature. In addition, students will have hands-on experience in analyzing fMRI data from preprocessing to higher-level techniques using univariate and multivariate analyses. Beyond this, graduate students will learn how to use scripting to create neuroimaging paradigms, automate analyses, and create analyses pipelines using BASH. The final project will be an oral presentation and a written study proposal to include a literature review, an fMRI paradigm, and an analysis pipeline for a future study.

Full details for HD 6635 - Introduction to Scripting for Functional MRI Analysis in Human Neuroimaging

Fall.
HD6650 Poverty, Children and the Environment This seminar examines how the physical and social contexts of disadvantage shape child development. We investigate how childhood disadvantage influences biology and health as well as cognitive and socioemotional development through the settings disadvantage children grow up in.

Full details for HD 6650 - Poverty, Children and the Environment

Fall.
HD7000 Directed Readings For study that predominantly involves library research and independent study.

Full details for HD 7000 - Directed Readings

Fall, Spring.
HD7010 Empirical Research For study that predominantly involves collection and analysis of research data.

Full details for HD 7010 - Empirical Research

Fall, Spring.
HD7020 Practicum For study that predominantly involves field experience in community settings.

Full details for HD 7020 - Practicum

Fall, Spring.
HD7030 Teaching Assistantship For students assisting faculty with instruction. Does not apply to work for which students receive financial compensation.

Full details for HD 7030 - Teaching Assistantship

Fall, Spring.
HD8060 Teaching Practicum For advanced graduate students who independently develop and teach an undergraduate topics course under the supervision of a faculty member.

Full details for HD 8060 - Teaching Practicum

Fall, Spring.
HD8990 Master's Thesis and Research

Full details for HD 8990 - Master's Thesis and Research

Fall, Spring.
HD9990 Doctoral Thesis and Research

Full details for HD 9990 - Doctoral Thesis and Research

Fall, Spring.
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