Undergraduate Research & Fellowship Opportunities

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Undergraduate Research & Fellowship Opportunities

Below, you will find undergraduate research opportunities in the Cornell Psychology Department.  Other resources include: Undergraduate Psychology opportunities outside of Cornell University and a general Cornell undergraduate research opportunities page.

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Join the Personality, Attachment, and Control (PAC) Lab

If you are interested in participating in the research conducted by the Personality, Attachment, and Control (PAC) Lab, would like to know more about research opportunities, or have questions regarding the application process, please contactus and let us know.

Undergraduate Research Assistant

• We are looking for bright, self-directed, and enthusiastic undergraduate students to assist on research projects examining the cognitive and affective processes operating when individuals interact with or simply think about people who are particularly significant (e.g., romantic partners, parents). To learn more about specific research projects please visit the research page. 

• Qualifications: Interest in Social and Personality Psychology, willingness to work 10 hours per week and attend weekly meetings, computer and/or organizational skills, and writing skills.

Research Assistant (RA) Application:

If you are interested in working as a research assistant in the PAC Lab during the academic year, then this is the place to be! I'm looking for undergraduate students who are intrinsically interested in Social and Personality Psychology and would like to learn to work with cognitive and neurophysiological measures. In particular, RAs will be assisting in the running various types of experiments, including those recording brain activity (EEG/ERP). 

Given that it takes some time to learn neurophysiological methodology, the RA position involves a minimum commitment of two semesters (e.g., Fall and Spring) and enrolling in 3 credits of undergraduate research each semester (3 credits translates into approximately 9 hours per week). RAs will learn about all aspects of running EEG/ERP and cognitive/behavioral studies, from subject recruitment to instructing subjects to affixing electrode caps. RAs will also be required to attend lab meetings, where we will talk about research in and outside of the lab. 

If you are interested in applying for an RA position, I'd like to learn a little more about you. Please download and complete the academic year application and submit it to pac_lab@cornell.edu for consideration. The best of luck! 

• Download the Academic Year RA Application

Summer Research Assistant (RA) Application:

If you are interested in working as an RA this summer, please consider joining the PAC Lab! The lab typically operates at 25% working compacity during the summer. Basically, we'll be focusing on wrapping up studies from the previous academic year, fine tuning data measures, and preparing for the Fall semester. As such, the lab only needs 1-2 students at most. Please complete the summer application and submit it to pac_lab@cornell.edu for consideration. 

• Download the Summer RA Application

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The Attention, Memory, and Perception lab (AMP Lab)

The Attention, Memory, and Perception lab (AMP Lab) investigates the mechanisms involved in perceiving and remembering everyday events and environments. We are currently running experiments on how people divide their experiences into meaningful units, how attention influences episodic memory, statistical learning, and mind-wandering.

Undergraduate RAs play an integral role to the lab. They work with a graduate student or faculty to learn about a project, recruit and schedule participants for experiments, collect and manage data, analyze and understand the data, and finally write a brief report on what was found. Undergraduate RAs are also expected to participate in weekly lab meetings, where we talk about ideas for new experiments, data we've collected, or a journal article.

For more information visit the lab's website at http://amp-lab.psych.cornell.edu  or email Khena Swallow at kms424@cornell.edu.

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The Integrative Neuroethology Lab

The Integrative Neuroethology Lab focuses on proximate and ultimate influences on social behavior: including individual variation in genes, brain and behavior; monogamy and social attachment; alternative reproductive tactics; parental care; early social influence on development; social & spatial memory; mate choice; animal communication.

Undergrads are usually involved in all aspects of our research. Students usually begin sectioning brain tissue, collecting data from behavioral video recordings, or imaging brains and collecting data from them. From there they may advance to designing and conducting experiments involving brain, behavior and genetics.

For more information, visit the lab’s website at, http://www.ophirlab.com/, or email Alex Ophir at ago25@cornell.edu

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William & Mary's Graduate Research Symposium 

Post Date:10/25/2019 End Date: 12/05/2019

19th Annual Graduate Research Symposium (GRS), March 20 & 21, 2020. We are seeking abstract submissions from currently enrolled graduate students in the following discipline(s): American Studies, Anthropology, Applied Science, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, History, Physics, Psychological Sciences, and Public Policy. 

This broadly themed conference is designed to bring together Arts & Sciences graduate students from differing areas of study and from all stages of the degree process. The congenial setting and professionally-oriented environment provide an opportunity for students to present and discuss their research, while fostering community relationships across discipline boundaries. Abstracts of no more 250 words (1,600 characters) are requested for the following categories of submission: Oral Presentations and Poster Presentations.

Categories above are defined according to William & Mary Arts & Sciences graduate programs. To determine if the Graduate Research Symposium is an appropriate forum to present your research, please review the abstract submittal guidelines for examples.

Please visit our webpage for additional information: http://www.wm.edu/as/grs

ABSTRACT DEADLINE: December 6, 2019 at 11:59pm EST

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Yale Fellowship in Developmental Psychopathology and Social Neuroscience

Post Date: 10/25/2019   End Date: 01/15/2020

Successful applicants will be involved in a 2-year training program involving clinical research experience. The primary training experience will be in daily activities related to behavioral, psychophysiological, eye-tracking and neuroimaging studies of toddlers and children with and without autism. With research mentorship, selected applicants will be expected to guide a pre-determined project of research from the point of data collection through analysis and publication of results. Completed applications including cover page, CV, official transcripts, letters of recommendation and personal statements are due no later than January 15, 2020. Additional information about the lab can be found on our website:  https://medicine.yale.edu/lab/chawarska/autismcenter/

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Marcus Autism Center Research Opportunities

Post Date: 10/25/2019  End Date: 01/03/2020

The Marcus Autism Center, in conjunction with the Emory University School of Medicine and Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, is offering four fellowships: the Cohen Fellowship in Developmental Social Neuroscience, the Simons Fellowship in Computational Neuroscience, the Education Sciences Fellowship, and the Marcus Fellowship in Speech Science and Engineering. Students who will receive a bachelor’s degree by June 2020 will be eligible for the positions. The fellowships will commence in July 2020, and they are 2 years in duration. Students can find further details at: cohenfellowship.org and simonsfellowship.org.

  • The Cohen Fellowship in Developmental Social Neuroscience will involve cutting-edge social neuroscience research in infants, toddlers and adolescents. Fellows will work to further the understanding of autism through eye-tracking research, guiding a project from the point of data collection to publication of results.
  • The Simons Fellowship in Computational Neuroscience will involve integrating computational strategies with clinical research goals. Fellows will develop methods for the analysis of visual scanning and eye-tracking data, computational models of visual salience, and data visualization techniques, all with the aim of advancing the understanding of autism and efforts at early diagnosis.
  • The Education Sciences Fellowship will involve research in educational innovations in autism, from early child care through high school. Fellows will learn about classroom-based interventions to increase social emotional engagement and inclusion, gaining experiences with observational research methods, cutting-edge intervention research, and implementation science approaches.  
  • The Marcus Fellowship in Speech Science and Engineering will involve researching early vocal development, including speech production and speech perception, as part of a program to map out both typical and atypical development of spoken communication in early childhood.

Submission Deadline is January 3, 2020

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The Tschida Lab

The Tschida Lab studies the neural circuit basis for vocal communication in mice, which produce ultrasonic vocalizations during courtship and other social interactions. We aim to understand how brains encode information about social context, which allows an animal to decide whether to vocalize, and how neurons control the acoustic features of vocalization, which endow them with communicative significance.  To address these questions, we use cutting-edge viral genetic tools to map, monitor, and manipulate the activity of neurons important to vocalization, combined with careful measurements of vocalizations and other social behaviors. 

We are actively recruiting undergraduates to perform research for credit in the lab.  Project responsibilities may include but are not limited to measurements of vocal and non-vocal social behavior in mice, measurements of behavior in mouse models of human communication disorders, and confocal imaging of neuron morphology and connectivity. For more information, please contact Dr. Katie Tschida (kat227@cornell.edu) with a brief letter of interest.

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The Applied Moral Psychology Lab

The Applied Moral Psychology lab’s (www.lauraniemi.com/lab) research focuses on the social psychology behind moral judgment, values, well-being and conflict. Seeking research assistants with experience collecting data using MTurk, TurkPrime, and Qualtrics; analyzing data using programs like R or SPSS; contributing to literature reviews; synthesizing findings; and evaluating studies in psychological science. Other tasks include designing and programming studies, recruiting, organizing data, assisting with IRB and open science practices, write-ups and presentations.

Please contact Dr. Laura Niemi at niemi@cornell.edu, Uris 244, if interested.

·We should also include this student employment link to the various classifications for student research positions on the internal page, maybe at the bottom with a statement that says something along the lines of “Student Research Assistantships are classified as levels I-IV based on job responsibilities, required skills and experience, level of supervision, and degree of decision-making for different types of jobs, as per the student employment classification scale: https://studentemployment.cornell.edu/jobs/wages-and-classifications/university-student-job-categories/student-researchfieldlab-assistant

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